Support and Resources | Rubraca® (rucaparib) tablets
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Support along the way

Resources for women taking Rubraca

Here are tools that you can download to help support you along your treatment journey.

personal diary

A personal diary to help you record important information and keep track of any side effects or symptoms you may be experiencing

Download journal
Rubraca for maintenance therapy

A brochure with information about taking Rubraca for maintenance therapy

Download brochure (English) Download brochure (Spanish)

Organizations supporting women, family members, and caregivers impacted by ovarian cancer

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY (www.cancer.org)

A comprehensive resource for information, support, and ways to become involved in the fight against cancer

CANCERCARE (www.cancercare.org)

Provides telephone, online, and face-to-face counseling, support groups, education, publications, and financial assistance

ONCOLINK (www.oncolink.org)

Find out about cancer treatment, blogs, and support

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE (www.cancer.gov)

Learn about clinical trials, research, and news

CARINGBRIDGE (www.caringbridge.org)

Connect with your family, friends, and other patients who want to share their personal stories

FACING OUR RISK OF CANCER EMPOWERED (FORCE) (facingourrisk.com)

Education, advocacy, and research specific to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

INSPIRE (www.inspire.com)

Join a community to share and learn about ovarian cancer, treatment, and support

NATIONAL OVARIAN CANCER COALITION (NOCC) (www.ovarian.org)

Learn how you can support cancer organizations, get medical information, and find future events

OVARIAN CANCER RESEARCH FUND ALLIANCE (OCRFA) (ocrfa.org)

A support network that connects survivors, women at risk, and caregivers

Glossary

Adverse reaction: any unexpected or dangerous reaction as a result of taking medication.

Antiemetics/antinausea medication: drugs taken to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting.

Clinical trial: research that is designed to test new medical approaches, such as new medicines, and find out if they work and are safe for people.

Complete response, or CR: absence of signs of cancer as a result of treatment. This does not always mean the cancer has been cured.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA): molecules that tell your cells how to survive and grow.

Disease progression: cancer that continues to grow or spread.

Genes: a set of coded instructions in cells for making new proteins and controlling how cells behave.

Median: the middle point in a range of numbers, half of which are above the middle point and half of which are below it. For example, in the following list of numbers—3, 5, 12—the median is 5.

Objective response rate, or ORR: the proportion of patients with a reduction in tumor size by a predefined amount and for a minimum duration. The FDA has defined ORR as the sum of partial and complete responses.

Partial response, or PR: tests show a decrease in the amount of cancer or tumor size in response to treatment, but the cancer is not completely gone.

Placebo: a substance that does not contain any active medication.

Platinum-based chemotherapy: chemotherapeutic agents containing the metal platinum, which is an important component of some anticancer drugs.

Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor: medication that blocks PARP, a protein that helps repair DNA when it becomes damaged. Blocking PARP may help keep cancer cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. This may also impact other cells and tissues.

Progression-free survival, or PFS: the length of time during and after a treatment that a person continues to live without the disease getting worse.

Response: therapeutic effect of treatment.

Side effect: a problem that may occur when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs.

Watchful waiting: when an oncologist does not provide medicine but closely watches the disease to see if symptoms appear or change. Watchful waiting is often adopted when the risks of treatment outweigh the benefits. Tests and exams can also be used at this time to monitor the disease.

Discover how Rubraca may help maintain the response to platinum-based chemotherapy

Trial Result Learn more

Find out about the possible side effects of Rubraca

side effects Learn more
Rita Video

Hear Rita's story about living with ovarian cancer and her experience in a Rubraca clinical trial

INDICATIONS

What is Rubraca?

Rubraca® (rucaparib) tablets are a prescription medicine used for:

  • the maintenance treatment of adults with ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, or primary peritoneal cancer whose cancer has come back and who are in response (complete or partial response) to a platinum-based chemotherapy
  • the treatment of adults with ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, or primary peritoneal cancer who have certain “BRCA” gene mutations, either inherited (germline) or acquired (somatic), and who have been treated with 2 or more chemotherapy medicines for their cancer. Your healthcare provider will perform a test to make sure Rubraca is right for you

It is not known if Rubraca is safe and effective in children. 

SELECT IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Read full

warning Rubraca tablets may cause serious side effects including bone marrow problems called Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) or a type of cancer of the blood called Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Some people who have ovarian cancer and who have received previous treatment with chemotherapy or certain other medicines for their cancer have developed MDS or AML during or after treatment with Rubraca. MDS or AML may lead to death. If you develop MDS or AML, your healthcare provider will stop treatment with Rubraca.

warning Symptoms of low blood cell counts are common during treatment with Rubraca but can be a sign of serious problems, including MDS or AML. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of the following symptoms during treatment with Rubraca:

  • weakness
  • weight loss
  • fever
  • frequent infections
  • blood in urine or stool
  • shortness of breath
  • feeling very tired
  • bruising or bleeding more easily

warning Your healthcare provider will do blood tests before, and every month during treatment with Rubraca to monitor your blood cell counts. Weekly blood tests will be performed if you have low blood cell counts for a long time. Your healthcare provider may stop treatment with Rubraca until your blood cell counts improve. 

warning Before you take Rubraca, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

warning

  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Rubraca can harm your unborn baby and may cause loss of pregnancy (miscarriage). You should not become pregnant during treatment with Rubraca.
    • If you are able to become pregnant, your healthcare provider may do a pregnancy test before you start treatment with Rubraca.
    • Females who are able to become pregnant should use effective birth control during treatment and for at least 6 months after receiving the last dose of Rubraca.
    • Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control methods that may be right for you.
    • Tell your healthcare provider right away if you become pregnant.

warning

  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Rubraca passes into breast milk. Do not breastfeed during treatment and for 2 weeks after the last dose of Rubraca. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby during this time.

warning Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. 

warning  While taking Rubraca, avoid spending time in sunlight.  Rubraca can make your skin sensitive to the sun (photosensitivity).  You may burn more easily during treatment with Rubraca. You should wear a hat and clothes that cover your skin and use sunscreen to help protect against sunburn if you have to be in the sunlight.

warning The most common side effects of Rubraca include:

  • nausea 
  • tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting
  • decrease in hemoglobin (anemia)
  • changes in how food tastes
  • constipation
  • decrease in appetite 
  • diarrhea
  • low blood cell counts
  • mouth sores
  • upper respiratory tract infection
  • shortness of breath
  • rash
  • changes in liver or kidney function blood tests
  • stomach (abdomen) pain
  • increased cholesterol levels

warning These are not all of the possible side effects of Rubraca. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects.

warning  You may report side effects to the FDA at 1‑800‑FDA‑1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Clovis Oncology, Inc. at 1‑415‑409‑7220 (US toll) or 1‑844‑CLVS‑ONC (1‑844‑258‑7662; US toll-free).

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, for additional Important Safety Information.

INDICATIONS

What is Rubraca?

Rubraca® (rucaparib) tablets are a prescription medicine used for:

  • the maintenance treatment of adults with ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, or primary peritoneal cancer whose cancer has come back and who are in response (complete or partial response) to a platinum-based chemotherapy
  • the treatment of adults with ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, or primary peritoneal cancer who have certain “BRCA” gene mutations, either inherited (germline) or acquired (somatic), and who have been treated with 2 or more chemotherapy medicines for their cancer. Your healthcare provider will perform a test to make sure Rubraca is right for you

It is not known if Rubraca is safe and effective in children. 

SELECT IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Read full

warning Rubraca tablets may cause serious side effects including bone marrow problems called Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) or a type of cancer of the blood called Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Some people who have ovarian cancer and who have received previous treatment with chemotherapy or certain other medicines for their cancer have developed MDS or AML during or after treatment with Rubraca. MDS or AML may lead to death. If you develop MDS or AML, your healthcare provider will stop treatment with Rubraca.

warning Symptoms of low blood cell counts are common during treatment with Rubraca but can be a sign of serious problems, including MDS or AML. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of the following symptoms during treatment with Rubraca:

  • weakness
  • weight loss
  • fever
  • frequent infections
  • blood in urine or stool
  • shortness of breath
  • feeling very tired
  • bruising or bleeding more easily

warning Your healthcare provider will do blood tests before, and every month during treatment with Rubraca to monitor your blood cell counts. Weekly blood tests will be performed if you have low blood cell counts for a long time. Your healthcare provider may stop treatment with Rubraca until your blood cell counts improve. 

warning Before you take Rubraca, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

warning

  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Rubraca can harm your unborn baby and may cause loss of pregnancy (miscarriage). You should not become pregnant during treatment with Rubraca.
    • If you are able to become pregnant, your healthcare provider may do a pregnancy test before you start treatment with Rubraca.
    • Females who are able to become pregnant should use effective birth control during treatment and for at least 6 months after receiving the last dose of Rubraca.
    • Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control methods that may be right for you.
    • Tell your healthcare provider right away if you become pregnant.

warning

  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Rubraca passes into breast milk. Do not breastfeed during treatment and for 2 weeks after the last dose of Rubraca. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby during this time.

warning Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. 

warning  While taking Rubraca, avoid spending time in sunlight.  Rubraca can make your skin sensitive to the sun (photosensitivity).  You may burn more easily during treatment with Rubraca. You should wear a hat and clothes that cover your skin and use sunscreen to help protect against sunburn if you have to be in the sunlight.

warning The most common side effects of Rubraca include:

  • nausea 
  • tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting
  • decrease in hemoglobin (anemia)
  • changes in how food tastes
  • constipation
  • decrease in appetite 
  • diarrhea
  • low blood cell counts
  • mouth sores
  • upper respiratory tract infection
  • shortness of breath
  • rash
  • changes in liver or kidney function blood tests
  • stomach (abdomen) pain
  • increased cholesterol levels

warning These are not all of the possible side effects of Rubraca. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects.

warning  You may report side effects to the FDA at 1‑800‑FDA‑1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Clovis Oncology, Inc. at 1‑415‑409‑7220 (US toll) or 1‑844‑CLVS‑ONC (1‑844‑258‑7662; US toll-free).

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, for additional Important Safety Information.